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Wednesday, 18 January 2017

Barrow's Inaguration: Nigeria Warship, Fighter Jets, ECOWAS Special Squad Head For Gambia

The Military Troops of the Nigerian Army will, on Wednesday (today), arrive at a base of the Economic Community of West African States troops in Senegal to ensure that President Yahya Jammeh of the Gambia steps down on Thursday, January 19.

Nigerian Naval also  emback on a marching order withe the Nigerian warship, NNS UNITY heading for the coast of The Gambia to join the operation. 

Also, it was gathered that Nigerian Air Force (NAF) would fully involve in the Opreation to Remove Jammeh as they were expected to airlift the troops. Air Force will leave for Senegal 0n Wednesday. They will be briefed by the Chief of Air Staff, Air Marshal Sadique Abubakar, at the Kainji base in Niger State.
That Nigeria is deploying troops is now a certainty after several meetings with The Gambian president yielded no result. The Chiefs of Defence Staff of ECOWAS countries came to Abuja on Saturday, where they discussed what components each member state is expected to contribute to the troops that will force Yahya Jammeh out.
The troops are expected to stay for two weeks and they will be received at a base in Senegal.”  530 Soldiers from Senegal, 600 from Ghana, 100 from Sierra Leone, 1,000 from Nigeria will storm Gambia today's Midnight.

200 Dreaded Fighters from France, UK and Germany will join ECOWAS Special Squad.

For the inauguration of newly elected President Adama Barrow, 30 fighters jets and 300 B52 will cross the borders of Gambia to escort Barrow to the Independence Stadium in Banjul the capital of The Gambia.

The Gambia's National Assembly has adopted a resolution to allow President Yahya Jammeh to stay in power for three more months, starting from Wednesday, according to state television.


Yahya Abdul-Aziz Jemus Junkung Jammeh, Gambian President declared a state of emergency on Tuesday after refusing to hand power to opposition leader Adama Barrow, who won an election last month.

State television said the emergency would prevent a power vacuum while the supreme court rules on Jammeh's petition challenging the election result.

That suggests Jammeh will stay in power beyond Thursday, when Barrow was due to have been sworn in as president.

Regional leaders have threatened to intervene militarily if Jammeh does not step down and on Tuesday a senior Nigerian army source said Nigeria and other West African states were preparing a military force.

"I ... hereby declare a state of public emergency throughout the Islamic Republic of Gambia," Jammeh's declaration said.

The state of emergency banned "acts of disobedience" and "acts intended to disturb public order"
The U.S. has warned the embattled President Yahya Jammeh of The Gambia, saying he is losing opportunities to peacefully handover to President-elect Adama Barrow and avoid the consequences of his actions. His tenure ends Jan. 19, the same day that Barrow is expected to be sworn-in as his successor.

The U.S. Department of State Spokesperson, Mr John Kirby, said at a press briefing on Tuesday that Jammeh was putting his legacy and The Gambia in peril. “President Jammeh is losing opportunities to respect the will of the Gambian people and to peacefully hand over power to the president-elect, which is supposed to happen on Thursday. “Doing so would allow him to leave office with his head held high and to protect the Gambian people from potential chaos.
Hundreds of Gambians have fled to Senegal, Gambia's only neighbor, fearing for their safety because of the turmoil, and Senegalese authorities have increased security. 

Due to security fears, Barrow is also in Senegal, unable to attend the funeral of his eight-year-old son, who died on Monday after a dog bite.

Yahya Abdul-Aziz Jemus Junkung Jammeh took power in a coup in 1994 as only the second president since Gambia's independence in 1965 and his government gained a reputation for torturing and killing perceived opponents, rights groups say. In 2015, he declared that the country was an Islamic Republic.

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